Indonesia, Flores

Wulla Poddu (Holy Month) celebration in Waikabubak, Sumba, Indonesia

 

 

Wulla Poddu or Holy Month is a festival related to Marapu, a cult of spirits of the ancestors. Wulla Poddu is held on Sumba in late October / early November and celebrated in a grand style.

 

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Waht to see and do in Sumba, Indonesia - Tarung and Waitabar villages

Tarung and Waitabar villages

 

Tarung and Waitabar villages are the main reason to come to Waikabubak. Located on a hill, the villages seem to have their own spacetime. Maybe that’s because of the Marapu (the ancestral) spirits still protecting those, who believe in them.

 

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Waht to see and do in Sumba, Indonesia - Waikabubak

What to see in Waikabubak

 

Waikabubak is the second largest city on the island of Sumba, after Waingapu. Some call it Waikabukak city but keep in mind that this “city” is inhabited by about 25,000 inhabitants, so don’t expect shopping centers or fancy food corners. The town has three main attractions: Prai Klembung, Tarung and Waitabar villages.

 

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What to see and do in Sumba, Indonesia

What to see and do in Sumba, Indonesia - Pasunga and Gallubakul

Pasunga and Gallubakul

 

Located in Anakalang district, Pasunga and Gallubakul required a detour from our “triangle route”. But since some of the finest megalithic tombs in Sumba are located here, and there’s no way Chris would skip them, we’ve made an effort.

 

 

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How to plan a trip to Sumba, Indonesia?

 

What to see and do in Sumba in 3 days? Check our travel itinerary. Going to Sumba will be easier with our tips and suggestions.

 

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how to plan a trip to sumba, indonesia
what to see in sumba indonesia

What to see in Sumba, Indonesia

 

Top destinations in Sumba that shouldn't be left out of your travel itinerary. Check what to see and do in Sumba!

 

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Common in shape, but extraordinary in culture – the island is one of the places we plan to visit again.

 

It might sound unlikely, but we came here to see one statue. Well, Chris came here to see one statue (he’s a huge enthusiast of the anthropomorphic figures) and had to find a way to persuade me to come with him (I, on the other hand, am not so eager to travel half a world only for a diminutive sculpture). I must say I wasn’t impressed with Sumba when we researched the guidebooks and websites. Chris almost begged me to snatch a couple of days from our holiday itinerary. Can’t say I liked the idea – it meant a couple of days less in Flores (the island that, in turn, I fell in love the moment I saw the pictures). Finally, we have settled on 3 days in Sumba. Much too short, as it turned out.

 

It was a very intense itinerary, packed with the “must-sees”, so we decided to rent a car with a driver. We highly recommend this form of transportation, especially if you travel with other people. The climate of Sumba is hot and humid, thus saving on the cost of transportation might spoil the fun of exploring the island.

 

Sumba was one of the biggest surprises (and discoveries) we ever made on our holidays. The fascinating architecture, bizarre beliefs and rituals, omnipresent horses (horse-riding is equivalent to walking in Sumba), the symbiosis between people and their domesticated animals (we were amazed to see the cows quietly grazing with small children literally playing on their tops)…It’s an ideal destination for those travelers, who want to experience something unusual and don’t mind things getting a bit harsh in the process (it’s not a popular destination, after all, so don’t expect Bali comforts).

Oh, and here’s the statue from which it all began:

 

 

 

 

 

 

In case you wonder, it is located in Waikabubak (Tarung and Waitabar villages) and we write about it in our articles (the links below).

what to see in sumba indonesia
what to see in sumba indonesia

Ratenggaro

 

Ratenggaro is a name shared by a village located in Kodi district, about 50 kilometers southwest from Tambolaka, and also a wide, sandy beach spread at the foot of the village. It is probably the most touristy place in Sumba, which still means you will most likely be the only stranger at the time of your visit.

 

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Ratenggaro, Sumba, Indonesia
Sumba Indonesia
Sumba Indonesia

Sumba in our photos

 

More of Ratenggaro, Waikabubak, Wainyapu, Pasunga and Gallubakul in our travel photos.

 

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Ratenggaro, Sumba, Indonesia

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